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    Why Shaare Zedek’s new Stroke Unit, Brain Center urgently needed in Jerusalem

Why Shaare Zedek’s new Stroke Unit, Brain Center urgently needed in Jerusalem

Advanced new services becoming available at Shaare Zedek for patients who experience a minor stroke or temporary ischemic attack (TIA) are the inaugural aspects of the Hospital’s “Brain Center,” a comprehensive neurology institute which, when fully rolled out, will house Jerusalem’s new Stroke Unit to diagnose, treat and monitor patients who suffer strokes, as well as trauma in terror attacks or accidents, brain tumors and other acute neurological conditions. It will be comprised of an Interventional Neuroradiology Unit, the Stroke Diagnosis and Treatment Unit, and a Department of Neurosurgery.

There is said to be “a golden hour” in which to save victims of serious trauma. Following a stroke, however, the difference between life, serious impairment and death are measured in minutes. For every minute elapsed from onset until appropriate care, the patient’s brain loses approximately two million neurons. The extent of preventable damage is similarly measured: the chance of surviving without disability shrinks 14% every 10 minutes from onset until care. And internationally-recognized data estimate a new stroke unit in the fast-growing Jerusalem area could expect to see over 2,000 stroke patients each year.

The Interventional Neuroradiology Unit will incorporate all necessary components to help people suffering serious neurological episodes. Minimally invasive image-based technologies will speed diagnosis and locate a clot or bleed in the brain. For some patients, a drug called TPA can dissolve a clot and reduce damage if administered within three to four hours of onset of the stroke.

The Stroke Diagnosis and Inpatient Unit will include six beds equipped and staffed as a Neurological ICU with physicians and nurses specifically trained in the care of stroke victims. Many patients may require lengthy hospitalizations and intensive monitoring. Within the Stroke Unit, there will be more >

By |August 4th, 2016|Announcements, Helmsley Neurological Center, News|Comments Off on Why Shaare Zedek’s new Stroke Unit, Brain Center urgently needed in Jerusalem|
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    The Hospital Kids Don’t Want to Leave: The Friedman Family Outpatient Pavilion of the Wilf Children’s Hospital at Shaare Zedek

The Hospital Kids Don’t Want to Leave: The Friedman Family Outpatient Pavilion of the Wilf Children’s Hospital at Shaare Zedek

Many of Tzippora Notis’s friends have married daughters who now have their own families. From time to time one of those young mothers will call her and no matter whom it is on the other end of the phone, Mrs. Notis says, the conversation nearly always sounds the same.

”I just want you to know that we had a medical situation that brought us to the outpatient clinics at Shaare Zedek,” the caller will say, ”And we saw your father’s name there. Could you please pass on to him what an unbelievable experience it was?”

It is the Friedman Family Outpatient Pavilion of the Wilf Children’s Hospital at Shaare Zedek Medical Center to which she refers — a generous gift to the people of Jerusalem by Mrs. Notis’ parents, Lea and Rabbi Jacob Friedman, of Los Angeles.

If only no child would ever need hospital care. Sadly, that’s not how life works, but in Jerusalem today, children are able to receive their necessary treatments in a setting that is so warm, and so loving, and just plain fun to visit, that they actually don’t want to leave. That may sound farfetched unless you know that the recently opened Wilf Children’s Hospital is a vibrant, brightly colored place with a music room, an art room, a veritable zoo of therapy animals that patients can hold and feed, and even a tablet computer at every bed, available for children to use at no charge.

But, particularly, it is the Friedman Family Outpatient Pavilion that has “changed the whole way that children look at going in for whatever treatments they have to go in for,” Mrs. Notis explained. “Just trying to get them to the Hospital — the crying and the more >

By |July 27th, 2016|News, Support ACSZ, Uncategorized, Wilf Children's Hospital|Comments Off on The Hospital Kids Don’t Want to Leave: The Friedman Family Outpatient Pavilion of the Wilf Children’s Hospital at Shaare Zedek|

Hot Off the Press — Heartbeat for Summer ’16

Watch your mail for the Summer 2016 issue of our Heartbeat Magazine. If you’re on our ‘snail mail’ list, that is. Otherwise, please email national@acsz.org with your full name and address.

 

 

 

 

 

 

By |July 13th, 2016|Announcements, News, Support ACSZ|Comments Off on Hot Off the Press — Heartbeat for Summer ’16|

Summer in Israel Sharpens Scorpion Risk

Summer is here and people are spending more time outside — which makes this a good time to be aware that scorpions tend to “hide” in thick brush and in dark and isolated areas. It is recommended to wear gloves when working in the garden and closed shoes when walking around at night, outside, in areas with thick vegetation. While camping, it is better not to sleep directly on the ground and remember to shake out your shoes before putting them on.
“Scorpions can be divided into two types, black and yellow scorpions,” explains Dr. Todd Zalut, director of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Shaare Zedek. “All bites can cause allergic reactions. While the bite from a black scorpion hurts a lot, the yellow scorpion has poisonous venom. People stung by a yellow scorpion may experience pain, swelling, tingling or numbness around the area of the bite. The person may have difficulty swallowing, blurred vision, roving eye movements, seizures, nausea, vomiting, respiratory distress, or agitation… Antivenom is one treatment option, however, it is only used in very severe cases since there is a potential for serious side effects.”
If you are stung by either type of scorpion please be sure to seek immediate medical attention. Have a safe and enjoyable summer.
 

By |July 12th, 2016|News, Uncategorized|Comments Off on Summer in Israel Sharpens Scorpion Risk|

Celebrating Israel On Fifth Avenue and On The Air

So maybe it was a little wet (though the heaviest rain came and went during the first half hour of the parade), but thousands of people marched up New York City’s Fifth Avenue anyway in the 2016 Celebrate Israel Parade on June 5, which this year coincided with Yom Yerushalayim — the 49th anniversary of the reunification of Jerusalem during the Six-Day War. Many more thousands of Israel’s most passionate supporters lined Fifth Avenue to watch them. American Committee for Shaare Zedek Medical Center was well-represented, both on our float and to listeners around the world who were able to see and hear the sights and sounds of the parade on the Nachum Segal Network. American Committee was the presenting sponsor of live coverage of the parade, anchored from start to finish by Nachum Segal, the internationally-known host of Jewish radio program JM in the AM, and Miriam L. Wallach, general manager of The Nachum Segal Network. American Committee CEO Rachel Wolf joined them in the broadcast booth at Fifth Avenue and 65th Street, near the entrance to the Central Park Zoo, for more than an hour, early in the parade.

Other guests on the program included the inspiring Racheli Frenkel, mother of one of three Israeli teens whose disappearance brought Israelis and Jews all around the world together in shared worry, then grief two summers ago (listen to her appearance here); as well as many notable political and Jewish communal leaders. Enjoy a full gallery of photos from Fifth Avenue here.

 

By |June 6th, 2016|Events, News, Photos|Comments Off on Celebrating Israel On Fifth Avenue and On The Air|
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    Shaare Zedek Opening Stroke Unit, Comprehensive Institute of Neurology

Shaare Zedek Opening Stroke Unit, Comprehensive Institute of Neurology

Fifteen-thousand Israelis suffer a stroke each year  more >

By |May 23rd, 2016|Announcements, News, Support ACSZ|Comments Off on Shaare Zedek Opening Stroke Unit, Comprehensive Institute of Neurology|

Dr. Howard Goldschmidt: My Mini-Sabbatical at Shaare Zedek

Early in 2016, after several years of planning and anticipation, Dr. Howard Goldschmidt of Teaneck, NJ took a month off from his busy interventional cardiology practice at The Valley Hospital in Bergen County, NJ, and used the time for what he called a “mini-sabbatical” at Shaare Zedek Medical Center. While there he performed trans-esophageal echocardiography procedures, his specialty, and taught medical residents and fellows in cardiology and emergency medicine. He also wrote a number of very interesting blog posts about his experiences, which he discussed in an interview on the Nachum Segal Network (pictured, above), and which we are proud to share with you here.

Sunday January 31: My first day of work at Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem, where the work week begins on Sunday and ends Thursday afternoon.

I depart the city of Modiin in my rented Hyundai hatchback (nice handling, weak engine) travelling on highway 443 along the 1948-1967 border, the back road to Jerusalem through the Judean Hills. The road is an ancient east-west trade route, mentioned in the books of Joshua, Samuel and Maccabees. After just a few miles, I pass the gas station where a soldier was stabbed to death in November. A few miles further is the turn-off for the small settlement of Beit Horon, where a 23-year-old woman was stabbed to death last month. The highway itself is safe, an observation balloon with dangling video cameras looming above. As 443 ends, the traffic slows. The “City of Gold” is visible in the distance. The 20-mile trip takes 45 minutes.

Already possessing a temporary medical license, I am rapidly processed and issued an ID and a lab coat. The heart center occupies the entire 10th floor of the building, cardiac surgery in one wing and all more >

By |April 14th, 2016|Announcements, News|Comments Off on Dr. Howard Goldschmidt: My Mini-Sabbatical at Shaare Zedek|

Mannon Kaplan and Family Adolescents Recreation Room

Shaare Zedek’s Wilf Children’s Hospital was designed with the understanding that it would serve as even more than a place of medical healing, but as a truly comprehensive center of caring for every need of a child who requires treatment in a hospital setting.  This understanding compelled our designers to include significant space for educational and recreational activities and, most notably, the Adolescents Recreation Room, which was donated by Mannon Kaplan and Family (Studio City, CA). It can be found on the Jack and Gitta Nagel Family Pediatric Inpatient Pavilion (7th Floor) of the Children’s Hospital.
The Kaplan Family Rec Room is the physical realization of a philosophy that says comprehensive medicine is as much about caring for a child’s emotional state as his or her physical one. For all too many children, hospital stays can be lengthy, sometimes extending for weeks or even months.  The Rec Room allows children an escape from the tough reality of hospitalization and to engage in a world of “release” — including to the internet, movies or electronic games.
The staff of teachers and volunteers from the Lincoln David Abraham Paediatric Educational Institute are available at all times to help with any need. But younger patients are also given the privacy they need and deserve to relax on their own terms and enjoy a few minutes or hours of relaxation.
To best understand the importance of the room we went and spoke with a young man named Moshe, for whom Shaare Zedek has nearly become a second home. Suffering from a rare blood disorder that requires very regular hospital visits, the now 14-year-old has been forced to achieve a level of maturity and patience well beyond his years. He is deeply familiar with all the medical nuances of more >

By |April 12th, 2016|Announcements, News, Photos, Wilf Children's Hospital|Comments Off on Mannon Kaplan and Family Adolescents Recreation Room|

Bat Mitzvah Celebration: Dressing Newborns at Shaare Zedek

Huvi Hirschey collected more than 500 baby outfits for distribution on the maternity ward

It’s been several years since Ahuva (Huvi) Hirschey of Elizabeth, NJ, first visited the maternity ward at Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem where her grandmother volunteers. Huvi, now 12, was a little girl at the time. But what her bubby, Jacqueline Maltz, told her then left a lasting impression: many babies born at Shaare Zedek each year won’t have a new outfit to wear home. Some are born into large families and receive older siblings’ hand-me-downs; others are born into families that simply can not afford a new outfit that will shortly be outgrown. Even more difficult is when a baby is born with a disability; often then people hesitate before even congratulating the parents, let alone offering a gift.

Huvi, whose smile lights up a room, decided that encouraging her guests to help would be an important part of her bat mitzvah celebration. The sixth grader at Joseph Kushner Hebrew Academy in Livingston included a note with her invitation that read, “My Bubby volunteers in the maternity department at Shaare Zedek hospital. Can you believe that more than 20,000 babies are born there each year? My Bubby told me that there are many mothers who are very poor and do not have a new outfit to put on their babies to go home. I really think that every new baby should go home wearing something new and not something torn or stained, and that is why I am asking for your help…” She asked for donations of new baby clothing and blankets.

The response was overwhelming. People brought shopping bags filled with adorable new baby clothes; over 500 outfits were more >

By |February 29th, 2016|News, Support ACSZ|Comments Off on Bat Mitzvah Celebration: Dressing Newborns at Shaare Zedek|

Treating Terror Victims At Shaare Zedek

On hundreds of occasions since August, ambulance crews have alerted the emergency room staff at Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem: a victim of a terrorist attack is on the way in.

The clock begins ticking and the Shock and Trauma Unit in the Weinstock Family Department of Emergency Medicine on the Fanya Gottesfeld Heller Floor begins to marshal its resources. In minutes, all necessary equipment and supplies are at the ready including units of blood and blood products for transfusion, and a team of doctors, nurses and other staff —  who vary according to the nature of the incoming patient’s injuries — are on hand, waiting for the ambulance.

Tragically, this scene has been replayed at Shaare Zedek more than 250 times in recent months, as of this writing. The victims of stabbings, shootings and deliberate vehicle rammings have included men, women and children — soldiers, expectant mothers, sabras and recent olim.

Politics are left outside the Hospital’s doors.

“We have Arab doctors treating Jewish patients, and in the next bed, Jewish doctors treating Arabs, maybe attackers,” explained Dr. Ofer Merin, a cardio-thoracic surgeon who is deputy director-general of Shaare Zedek and executive director of the Trauma Unit. “I never try to match an Arab physician to an Arab patient, or a Jewish physician to a Jewish patient, even though language makes it easier. It would be like saying: ‘OK, you’re an Arab, you treat the terrorist.’ No. If someone is shot and comes in, he is treated the same as anyone else who is shot.”

“There are six beds in the Trauma Unit. In bed number one you might find a lady injured by a terrorist; in bed number two could be a child injured by a terrorist; and more >

By |February 18th, 2016|News|Comments Off on Treating Terror Victims At Shaare Zedek|